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I forgot to define a most basic concept: Euclidian methods = Euclid’s geometric principles.
These are the principles we are taught in high school and college. If you take any college courses on differential equations you may touch briefly on nonlinear equations.
Euclidean geometry is a mathematical system still taught in secondary school as the first axiomatic system and the first examples of formal proof.
A linear equation is one where all the exponents are 1. (The formal definition is y = mx+b, where m=slope of the line and b is the y intercept.)
The definition of a nonlinear equation is an equation that is not linear. Really, what this means is that the exponent of y and/or x is not = 1 or 0.
So proponents of the popular global warming are projecting a Euclidian system on a nonlinear problem.
The earth is over 4 billion years old, maybe 5 billion years old and they can go back 1000 or 2000 years to try prove a trend?
So, in other words, the earth has been here on the order of 109 years and you want to take a sample on the order of 103 years. You are taking a sample of .000001% of the total years, computed like this 103 / 109 = 10-6 / 102 = 10-8 = .000001%.
A sample size of like this should not lead to a great deal of confidence in your global warming theory, especially when their method of establishing a trend is so shaky.
Maybe it’s true, but I could also win the lottery this coming Saturday.
Any questions?

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One Comment

  1. I’m sorry, but this is complete and udder BS.
    My grandpa wrote it… he has an interesting perspective on the world.


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